Neighbors: Keeping Us Inspired

It’s now early 2019 and like everyone we have a lot to look forward to in the coming year.   Everyone is busy making plans and attempting to execute them. Generally, the first step in every year should be to take down your holiday decorations because you don’t want to be that neighbor. Good neighbors are there to lend a helping hand and help keep you in check.  Neighbors build up communities and we should all strive to be good neighbors. While thinking about community I started thinking about the Southeast and our skateboard neighborhood, not necessarily Georgia, but the surrounding scenes. What videos or shops inspired me to want to be better, or at least got me excited to go skate. Here’s what I came up with: Read More >

Greyson Beal – Chasing a Dream

Greyson Beal Ambush Skateboarding

“Do not underestimate the ‘power of underestimation’. They can’t stop you, if they don’t see you coming.” 

Izey Victoria Odiase

Greyson Beal has always been on the outside looking in. People question his street cred, doubt his “core” bona fides, and generally dismiss his skateboarding as “too contesty”. Greyson is an undeniably talented skateboarder, but why is he always looked at with a sort of side-eyed suspicion? Why are people so quick to write him off?  Well, maybe that’s right where he wants to be? Maybe that’s his plan? Maybe we’re all playing checkers while he’s playing chess?

Greyson Beal Ambush Skateboarding

“Only a fool would underestimate a man with nothing to lose.” 
Read More >

Ambush Skateboarding x Cole Vanthof “Good Ol’ Boys” Video

We are stoked that Cole Vanthof‘s project “Good Ol’ Boys” has come to light and even better the the crew at Thrasher put it up on their site for all to see.  This project was shelved for a time while Cole’s focus was pulled elsewhere,  but we’re glad it came out and the final product is a visual pleasure of some of the best skateboarding in Georgia.

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Daily Bread x RJD2 at Variety Playhouse in Atlanta

Daily Bread x RJD2 October 6th, 2018

RJD2 with Daily Bread x Obeah

This past Saturday a few of us headed to see our good friend and dope as hell music monster Rhett Whatley (aka Daily Bread) open up for none other than RJD2 at The Variety Playhouse.  Talking with Rhett leading up to the show he told us he would dial in some all-access passes if we came out for a damn good time.  So you best believe we did.

Myself, John (ABC Buyer) and the other Jon (OG ABC) headed out to arrive for soundcheck around 6:30 or so and seeing Rhett’s name on the marquee upon arrival was dope as hell.  I mean…RJD2 and Daily Bread?  Variety has gone under some renovation in recent years…and it’s much more open of a venue now and the front bar is open on all sides.  We walked down to the stage and see Rhett and we take the tour backstage to the green room and proceed to catch up like old times.  It’s soundcheck time by now and we post up in the empty theater and listen to RJD2 iron out some tunes and then Rhett and Obeah.  WE. ARE. STOKED. at this point.

Rhett and RJ sound testing

Before I get ahead of myself I must admit that my trusty old Nikon D3 w/ 50 mm was my weapon of choice for the night.  I’ve shot hundreds of shows over the past 15+ years with it…and after a bit I noticed my autofocus was shot.  Like…maybe the camera got dropped a few weeks ago, but…anyway…I did the best with what I had.  Just like going into battle – use your weapon to the best of your ability.

With showtime quickly approaching and bodies piling in, the vibe was instantly set when Rhett dropped his new joint “Atlanta” featuring Sugar Tongue Slim.

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A Night In Atlanta w @stsisgold. Meet us there tomorrow for the debut transmission. 📡

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Electric.  Vibes were now at an all-time high.  John and Jon were posted up at the back bar with a bird’s-eye view and arguably where the best sound was (sound guy was just under them) and I was floating through the crowd, backstage, side stage…where ever really.   I wanted to just capture the evening as best I could.  I was really overjoyed/overwhelmed for Rhett and all that he has been doing up to this point.   I definitely think his Red Rocks Show with Pretty Lights was a record high, but for me being a big RJD2 fan, this was my highlight for him and almost any show I’ve ever been to.

Daily Bread x Obeah absolutely crushed it.  They had so many killer moments in their relatively short 45-minute set.  Obeah is a knockout on the mic and on the turntables, and Sugar Tongue Slim killed it.

So my RJD2 story is a pretty quick one from that night.  After the homies played there was a 10-15 minute interlude were we all caught up and congratulated him on this show and then I quickly went backstage, as I wanted to see RJD2 get ready to do the damn thing.   As I was standing where the artists walk up the stage this crazy ass creature comes running up the stairs and it freaked me the hell out.  I couldn’t grab my camera fast enough.
RJD2 scared the shit out of me
I snapped this blurry image at the same time the creature says to me, “You ready to fucking do this!”  Just me and RJ (we’re obviously boys now).  He creeps up the stairs just behind the curtain and yells back at me, “Tell them I ready now.  It’s fucking showtime!”  Like a more handsome version of CJ Parker running down the beach I sprinted to the sound guy and yelled, “HE IS READY!”  Hauled ass to backstage and proceed to watch a master at his craft for a few jams then met back up with the crew to watch the show.

It was one for the books.  We, of course, went out and bar hopped and talked about the show all night over several beverages, met new friends, and spread the gospel of Daily Bread, just some kid I gave a record player to 10 years ago.  Who could have known…

Make sure you follow Daily Bread and all the Philos Record crew for future dates.  We’ll see you at a show soon.

A Photo Gallery of the Night:

Jumping Off a Bridge: Skateboarding’s On-Trend Viral Challenges

“If all your friends jumped off a bridge, would you?”  This sentiment pops into my head every time I see a new viral challenge.  Whether it’s covering your eyes while flipping your skateboard in hand, skating in freeway traffic, or the ghost ride challenge, there is always some new craze to amuse us.

board flip challenge
On-trend victim, Clint Walker takes on the board flip challenge.

 

Of course, fads like these are not exclusive to skateboarding.  Look at the mannequin challenge, dance challenges (#inmyfeelingschallenge), or the infamous Tide PODS challenge.  People love to film themselves doing stupid stuff.  It’s like the apps were designed just for it.

Back in the day, we had to wait for latest Big Brother video, CKY, or episode of Jackass for inspiration.  Afterwards we’d grab our parents’ camcorder, replicate, and that was about the extent of it.  We never had any intentions on something being “viral” because it didn’t exist! Read More >

Go Skateboarding Day 2018

Go Skateboarding Day 2018
Photo: Levi Dills

Without fail, every year “Go Skateboarding Day” sneaks up on us.  Could you blame us?  It always seems as though the day just passed.  Why shouldn’t we get deja vu since we consider every day “Go Skateboarding Day.”  Truthfully, nothing outside the ordinary happens on June, 21st.  Sure, there are a few special events, some sanctioned by the governing board of the International Association of Skateboard Companies, and other events that aren’t trademarked.  Regardless, to me the day always tends to feel about the same wherever it’s observed.  That’s because, at its core, “Go Skateboarding Day” is just another day revolving around kicking it with friends both new and old and celebrating the ever continuous joy of riding a useless wooden toy.  The spirit of the day is truly infectious.  Although, with all due respect, if the freestyler brainiacs that make up the IASC (in all their infinite wisdom) could pick a shorter day next time around, maybe, my sunburn won’t be so bad.

This year after weighing our options, we decided to keep it simple.  “Don’t overthink it, let’s pack up the van with boards, water, Gatorade, and hit the road,” I said.   “It’ll be sick because we’ll grab doughnuts and pizza too!  Everyone’s hungry, right?”  However, as our impromptu “Go Skateboarding Day” progressed, pizza seemed far from mind and, in retrospect, maybe the missing puzzle piece was the missing pizza slice?  Next year, I swear we’ll make pizza a mandatory.  That…and maybe beer.  Like you, I’ll keep my fingers crossed too. Read More >

Boards and Breweries

Peter Raffin, Skateboarding, Beer, Shotgunning
Peter Raffin knows it!

It comes as no surprise to hear “Beer and Skateboarding go together like PB&J,” or as a true “Millennial” might say, “Avocado and Toast.”  Most of age skateboarders would probably agree with this.  Responsibly sharing a couple of brews with the homies amid a mini ramp session is great and it’s no secret.  It’s a trend made clearer when you see bigger brands like Brixton collaborate with Coors Original, 686 partner with Pabst Blue Ribbon, or the fact your favorite Street League pros will retire fruitfully off their windfall craft beer investments.  More so, it wouldn’t be a stretch to draw parallels between the craft beer renascence of recent years to the boom in small, independent skateboard brands currently taking the industry by storm.  Seemingly every time you blink a new skate brand is created.  With this in mind, it makes total sense for me to pair my favorite local brews with my favorite independent skateboard brands.  What’s not to love?  Boards and Breweries.

street league, saint archers, paul rodriguez, nine club
Saint Archer’s Money.

Creature Comforts’ “Tropcalia” and Blvd Skateboards

For a couple years now beer aficionados living in the Southeastern United States have raved about Creature Comforts’ Tropicalia IPA for its balanced, fruit-forward, hoppy flavor.  Often times, this IPA can be hard to find in the wild, and the same goes for a BLVD skateboard deck.  The beer gets it’s name “Tropicalia” from the Brazilian artistic movement that arose in the late 1960s.  Much like Creature Comforts’ affinity for a smooth, aromatic, citrusy IPA, BLVD shares an equivalent palette for skateboarding.  Look no further than their team’s pro roster for a heavy, stylish, and super smooth Brazilian style.  With guys like Rodrigo Petersen, Danny Cerezini, Carlos Iqui, and Tiago Lemos skateboarding for BLVD, it’s easy to see why I would pair the brand with this stellar IPA.

Monday Night Brewing’s “Dr. Robot” and Sour Solution Skateboards

Hailing from Atlanta, Monday Night Brewing has continued they’re expansion over the past several years, quickly becoming the brewery of choice for me.  Their year-round offerings consist of anything from a killer scotch ale aptly named Drafty Kilt to a Belgian-style wit named Fu Manbrew.  Monday Night’s lineup not only boasts humor, but depth.  Just don’t let Monday Night’s variety be mistaken for a weakness.  They didn’t spread themselves too thinly, and in my opinion, any of their beers would be another breweries breadwinner.  The same can be said for the eclectic Euro brand Sour Solution, which has an as extensive team that excels at whatever terrain lays ahead.  All-terrain riders like Barney Page and Oscar Candon both kill it in the streets and park, while Gustav Tonneson and Albert Nyberg’s approach may make you question their planetary origin.  For example, take Free Skateboard Magazine’s latest cover:

Barring, maybe, Rodney Mullen, who would have thought to Casper slide a wall?  NO ONE.  Furthermore, who would have thought a Casper could look so cool?  Well, again, NO ONE.  I have been proven wrong by Albert’s feat.  So, when it came time for me to pair Sour Solution with a brew from Monday Night, I decided to pick one I thought Monday Night would fail with.  That beer would be the new blackberry lemon sour Dr. Robot.  As apprehensive about it as I was, I’ll happily admit, for a sour, it’s great!  Kind of like Albert Nyberg’s Free Skateboard Magazine cover.  So a sour brew for Sour Solution.

Reformation Brewery’s “Stark” and Isle Skateboards

I’m often stuck in what I’ll coin as “beer Groundhog Day” where I’ll continuously drink the same two or three types or styles of beer ad nauseam.  Truthfully my go-to beers are normally pale ales, IPAs, and maybe a pilsner or two.  What beer always breaks this cycle?  If you guessed a strong porter, then you guessed right!  Just down the highway in Woodstock, GA, is Reformation Brewery and their Stark porter is a thing of beauty.  This beer is dark and full of robust character that hints of toasted malts and chocolate.  Since porters first were developed in London in the 18th century, what better brand to pair this porter with than with London’s very own Isle Skateboards.  Isle’s visual offerings tend to be dreary, but entrenched in strong, powerful skateboarding through unique tricks and spot selections.  Good on ya, chaps!

Red Hare Brewing’s “Long Day Lager” and Scumco & Sons

Has it been a long day? Maybe it’s been a long week. Either way, celebrate the beginning of summer with us tonight at the brewery! We’ve got live music and food for our Longest Day party, 5:30-8:30! #redharebrewery #longdaylager Read More >

Who Is Pat Moore?

  • Pat Moore is the proprietor of Ass Industries, the manufacturer of Haul Ass Wax.  Haul Ass Wax won Snowboarder Magazine’s Golden Seal of Approval for the fastest all-temp wax.
  • Pat is one of only a handful of snowboarders who can send it equally hard in the streets as he does in the park and the backcountry…and is easily one of the most complete all-around snowboarders in the game.
  • Pat Moore’s favorite rider is Jamie Lynn.  Mine too.
  • He’s from Holderness, NH, an agricultural and resort area and home to the Squam Lakes Natural Science Center.
  • His first video part was in 2003’s Video Gangs alongside Jimi Tomer and Travis Kennedy.
  • He has dedicated his entire career to filming video parts (no contests – unless, of course, it’s the X Games Real Snow video competition).
  • He designed his own Volcom Snow outerwear and Electric goggles with the stated goal of looking damn fine while running the same gear all season long.
  • Interestingly enough, Pat Moore doesn’t have a board sponsor.  He does get snowboards from Volcom though, even though Volcom doesn’t actually produce snowboards.  Pat’s “Volcom snowboards” are made by CAPiTA.  His boards aren’t available to the public, but we’re giving one away to a lucky winner.  Enter for your chance to win below.
  • Read More >

    2017: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    2017 is nearly a wrap and for the first time in ages I feel that collectively we can all breathe a slight sigh of relief.  Why?  Well, we made it out of the dumpster fire that was 2017, guys.  While that is reason enough to tie one on and celebrate, let’s not get too excited.  Regrettably, 2018 is revving up to be just as turbulent.  Whether it’s the constant barrage of bad news or social media overload, it’s apparent that it is harder to focus now more than ever.  Like many, my mind has was cooked by 2017.  So that’s my excuse for why my very cliche year-end “best of” or “listicle” may be missing some very noteworthy things.  With that said, in no particular order, here are somethings that made some crumby days brighter in 2017.

    The Atlantic Drift series by Jacob Harris Read More >

    Dusting off the VCR: Bloody Chicken Boots at 16

    Bloody Chicken Boots Title Screen

     

    My first viewing of Bloody Chicken Boots

    Rarely do I remember the exact moment I watched a skate video for the first time.  That is unless I attended the video premiere, or the video made some sort of immediate impression on me.  The impression doesn’t necessarily have to be good either, it can be bad too.  With that, I do distinctly remember the first time I watched Ambush’s first skate video, Bloody Chicken Boots, and it wasn’t because the video was particularly spectacular.

    I remember rolling up to the shop with some friends on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon sometime in 2001.  This was Ambush’s old location, the one with the infamous three stair.  Anyway, I was posted up on the couch, which sat across from on of those antiquated big screen televisions.  You know the type…the old projection ones that have the VCR’s timecode burned into the screen.  Admittedly, I was a little hungover from the prior night’s endeavors.  Still, I had no idea a skate video contained the power to augment my hangover.  Was it was the filming or the odd techno songs that caused my stomach to churn.  Who knows?  What I do know is that my first viewing of Bloody Chicken Boots was nauseating.  This made the viewing permanently burned into my brain, just like the timecode burned into the big screen it played on.

    Recently I noticed that BCB wasn’t online and it had been ages since I’d seen it.  Seeing this opportunity, I set out to capture the VHS and expand Ambush’s digital archive.  During my efforts, I watched it a few times and, surprisingly, it’s  better than I remembered.  The video holds a special type of nostalgia reserved normally for old awkward photos.  The photos can sometimes be slightly embarrassing, but also rad.  While digesting the video, I decided to reach out to some of the people involved in making it.  After all, Blood Chicken Boots is now 16 years old, and what better time to get their respective takes on the video.

    Stormy Pruett

    Stormy Pruett at the 40 Yard

    Q: Pretty hard to believe that Bloody Chicken Boots is 16 years old.  When do you think the last time you watched it was?

    A: Dude, I probably haven’t seen the video in about 10 years.  So long ago.  The random thing is that people still bring it up in the store, every once in a while.  For one reason or another, the video stuck with them and they totally remember everyone’s part and the most random stuff about it.  Crazy, right?!

    Q: What was your initial perception of the video and your part?

    A: First perception was, what is up with the name?!  Me and Brian Hutch had just got on right [the Ambush skate team] before the video was to come out.  It was Ryan Taylor’s baby as far as I know.  But, Ryan is a rad dude and knows what’s up, so I had faith in him and the video.  Music was mad crazy on most of the parts.  I think that Ryan and the homies made most of the jams themselves, I could be wrong about that one.  Regardless of the name and music, Ryan’s and Brian’s parts ripped!!!  I have a lot of respect for those guys.

    Q: If you had the chance to pick your music, what would you have ran with?

    A:  It would have probably been something by the band Fifteen.  I was so into those guys back then.  I was convinced that, if every person listened to their first couple of albums, that the world would be a better place.  Those early songs by them are life changers, brother.  A bunch of us got to see them here in Atlanta at the old Somber Reptile before they broke up.  Randomly, when I was skating in SF, I noticed a flyer on a street pole that said Fifteen was playing a reunion show that night.  We got to see them in their hometown.  Funny thing was that to us they were THE band and we thought the show would be sold out.  When we got there, there probably were only 50 people at the show, but we went ape shit.  One of the best shows that I have ever seen.

    Q: What’s up with that slam at the beginning of your part?  Did you break your wrist or something?  I always hated that it was shown over and over. Read More >

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